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  • Trevor Cooper

How frequent are false allegations?

I have often read glib statements such as:

  • False allegations are rare - and politicians used this manufactured MYTH to justify not changing the laws and not prosecuting perjury.

  • During the divorce people are under extreme stress and “not themselves” and would be wrong to prosecute – which if applied to all criminal actions would result in anarchy.

  • If we prosecute the person that committed perjury with a fine or jail time it would have a negative impact on the children in their care – which results in the custodial parent effectively using the child as a shield and can say or do anything

  • I have even spoken to a Shadow AG who indicated the judges go through the facts and “get it right” – yet we so frequently see the wheels of justice being so slow and evidence not presented. “Justice delayed is justice denied”

Lies to police and the court are used as one tool in a quest for coercive control and remove a discarded spouse against their will. It results in the abuse the children, breaking their natural bonds to a “good enough” parent (which is political speak is a parent that does not harm the child and wants to remain a parent).


By far the most damming evidence of the governments incompetence in this area was from the parliamentary inquiry “A better family law system to support and protect those affected by family violence”. Many people had submitted their experience and I knew of one lady that submitted the story of her brother that suicided after ten years of not seeing his children. Yet all these probably harrowing stories were suppressed under S121 of the Family Law Act.


Amongst the recommendations and references were:

  • #5 …..the development of a stronger regime of penalties including cost orders to respond to abuse of process, perjury and non-compliance with court orders.

  • #8 The Committee recommends that abuse of process in the context of family law proceedings be identified in the list of example behaviours as set out in section 4AB(2) of the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth).

  • S3.66-s3.68 of the report saw perjury discussed extensively and yet the government has done NOTHING, claiming it was awaiting the Law Reform Commission report and yet still done nothing since that report was released.


I deal regularly with those falsely accused and in my own circumstances:

  • “I will tell the police that you have been abusing me for ten years” statement by Nellie was used to incite fear and therefore control. From a factual perspective the assurances from the police that they would need evidence and was outlined in my book, changes to police statements were made and documented by the police were shown by their contradictions to be lies.

  • The threats in the court foyer “put a bullet through you” and my firm belief, if given the opportunity she would follow through

  • Massive perjury that extended the case and cost a huge amount of money (that will not benefit our children)

  • Hiding and fighting against the production of evidence

  • The hiring of the crazies that lodged false reports to police and resulted in wasted police time and believe issued the veiled death threat all to cause fear and anxiety.

  • What I found when investigating web forums that Nellie knowingly lied, based upon some of the questions that were asked.

The report submitted by a law firm to the Attorney general (that can be downloaded via my web site at https://www.trevorcooperauthor.com/book-referenced-material) showed the change in litigation trends following the removal of the perjury provisions within the Family Law Act suggest false allegations have become more common.



False allegations as outlined in my book are a massive issue and need to be tackled at every touch point in “The Family Separation Industry” as they are used to remove a parent, delay mediation, delay court cases and therefore resolution. In my opinion, removal of this tool is possibly the best thing that can be done to speed up the system and lessen its impact on our children which is what the Family court is meant to focus upon.

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DISCLAIMER: Trevor Cooper is not a lawyer or psychologist and whatever said on this site, publications, blogs or elsewhere should not be taken or construed as legal or psychological advice. Trevor recommends to seek professional advice on any of the issues raised within any of the above published material..